Archive for June, 2009



Shuttin’ Detroit Down

Performed by John Rich at the American Country Music Awards

Short Biographies of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence

John Adams

 

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Born: October 30,1735
Birthplace: Braintree,Mass
Died: July 4,1826

Adams began his education in a common school in Braintree. He secured a scholarship to Harvard and graduated at the age of 20.
He apprenticed to a Mr. Putnam of Worcester, who provided access to the library of the Attorney General of Massachusetts, and was admitted to the Bar in 1761. He participated in an outcry against Writs of Assistance. Adams became a prominent public figure in his activities against the Stamp Act, in response to which he wrote and published a popular article, Essay on the Canon and Feudal Law. He was married on Oct. 25, 1764 and moved to Boston, assuming a prominent position in the patriot movement. He was elected to the Massachusetts Assembly in 1770, and was chosen one of five to represent the colony at the First Continental Congress in 1774.
Again in the Continental Congress, in 1775, he nominated Washington to be commander-in-chief on the colonial armies. Adams was a very active member of congress, he was engaged by as many as ninety committees and chaired twenty-five during the second Continental Congress. In May of 1776, he offered a resolution that amounted to a declaration of independence from Gr. Britain. He was shortly thereafter a fierce advocate for the Declaration drafted by Thos. Jefferson. Congress then appointed him ambassador to France, to replace Silas Dean at the French court. He returned from those duties in 1779 and participated in the framing of a state constitution for Massachusetts, where he was further appointed Minister plenipotentiary to negotiate a peace, and form a commercial treaty, with Gr. Britain. In 1781 he participated with Franklin, Jay and Laurens, in development of the Treaty of Peace with Gr. Britain and was a signer of that treaty, which ended the Revolutionary War, in 1783.

He was elected Vice President of the United States under Geo. Washington in 1789, and was elected President in 1796. Adams was a Federalist and this made him an arch-rival of Thos. Jefferson and his Republican party. The discord between Adams and Jefferson surfaced many times during Adams’ (and, later, Jefferson’s) presidency. This was not a mere party contest. The struggle was over the nature of the office and on the limits of Federal power over the state governments and individual citizens.

Adams retired from office at the end of his term in 1801. He was elected President of a convention to reform the constitution of Massachusetts in 1824, but declined the honor due to failing health.
He died on July 4, 1826 (incidentally, within hours of the death of Thos. Jefferson.) His final toast to the Fourth of July was “Independence Forever!” Late in the afternoon of the Fourth of July, just hours after Jefferson died at Monticello, Adams, unaware of that fact, is reported to have said, “Thomas Jefferson survives.”

Suggested Reading about John Adams: “John Adams” by David McCollough

Grand Rapids Counter-Protest of HR 676 the Socialized Medicine Bill

Grassroots in Michigan organized a counter-protest of HR 676 in Grand Rapids 5-30-09

HR 676 is the “cradle to grave” socialized medicine bill. HR 676 … eliminating choice, and narrowing all of your options down to the single payer, specifically, the federal government.
The federal government, because they will be the ones with the money, will dictate to you what treatments, medicines, and procedures you can or cannot have….kill hundreds of thousands of jobs connected to the private healthcare industry, reduce the income level of the medical profession forcing much of the talent to leave the industry or to not enter the industry in the first place, increase the waiting time for care, and put your health matters into the hands of federal bureaucrats with only cutting the costs of the programs in mind. Healthcare costs will swell, quality of care will drop

Indicatations are that the liberals are ramming this committee and this bill could be up for vote as soon as August. We need to act NOW
What can Tea Party Activists do?

• Email, call, fax, or write your representatives
• Write a Letter to the Editor
• Post to opinion sections of newspaper websites
• Call talk radio
• Send information to your entire email address book
• Talk to your friends, family, and neighbors about the facts

Contact information links, nationwide:House of Represenatives

Kelli recounts her experience as a student living in Russia

Name Calling Socialist at Counter-Protest


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